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Friday, March 24, 2017

New video by Global Mountain Bike Network on YouTube

Best 2017 Mountain Bike Tech From The Taipei Cycle Show
Si Richardson from GCN is at the Taipei Cycle Show and is bringing us some cool new 2017 tech! Si used to be on the GB Cross Country team so safe to say he know's his tech! Subscribe to GMBN: http://ift.tt/1HnIPRp Get exclusive GMBN gear in the GMBN store! http://gmbn.eu/jd Check out some awesome MTB tech from Box, TRP, Cane Creek, Rock Shox and many more from the 2017 Taipei Cycle Show in Taiwan. Translate this video: http://gmbn.eu/je Watch more on GMBN... 1x Vs 2x: http://gmbn.eu/1xVS2x 📹 Dirt Shed Show: http://gmbn.eu/DSS106 📹 Click here to buy GMBN T-shirts, hoodies and more: http://gmbn.eu/jd The Global Mountain Bike Network is the best MTB YouTube channel, with videos for everyone who loves dirt: from the full-faced helmet downhill mountain biker to the lycra-clad cross country rider along with everyone and anyone in between. With the help of our pro and ex-pro riding team we’re here to inform, entertain and inspire you to become a better mountain biker, including videos on: - How to ride faster with expert knowledge - Fix everything with pro know-how - Ride anything with world-cup winning skills - Dial in your bike with bike set-up advice - In-depth entertaining features - Chat, opinion and interact with us on the Dirt Shed Show Welcome to the Global Mountain Bike Network | Covering Every Angle Thanks to our sponsors: Canyon bikes: http://gmbn.eu/Canyon SCOTT bikes: http://ift.tt/1ea4Q8V crankbrothers pedals: http://ift.tt/1C2fzNF crankbrothers seatposts: http://gmbn.eu/8b Six Six One Protection: http://ift.tt/2kslMOE POC helmets and eyewear: http://ift.tt/2i0W428 Topeak: http://gmbn.eu/topeak FSA: http://gmbn.eu/fsa Ergon: http://gmbn.eu/ergon YouTube Channel - http://gmbn.eu/GMBNsubs Facebook - http://gmbn.eu/GMBNFB Google+ - http://ift.tt/1E5Xfkz Twitter - http://gmbn.eu/GMBNTW Instagram - http://gmbn.eu/GMBNIG GMBN Shop - http://gmbn.eu/gmbnshop GMBN newsletter - http://gmbn.eu/email Leave us a comment below!


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NPR News: Trump Faces Most Consequential Day Of His Presidency So Far

Trump Faces Most Consequential Day Of His Presidency So Far
The president's reputation as a deal-maker is on the line Friday as House Republicans face a politically perilous vote to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

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Do I Have Psychological Disorder?

From a teen in Indonesia: I do not like interaction with humans, I do not expect a deeper relationship from a colleague, I do not like when other people are trying to change myself, I do not like being told what to do.

Yes, I am young, 19 to be precise. I have friends, but I do not feel want to know them but to avail of them (both emotionally and materially). For me, human are only tools and idea generator.

Some people say that I am a psychopath. I do not know where that idea came from. I do not have a criminal record, even though I did sometimes committed a minor offense for the work efficiency. I’ve been told to have defective expression, think like a robot (black and white), genius (just because I can read other people’s motives), individualists, indifferent.

Personally, I consider myself inferior. I panic and nauseated after feeling that I took the wrong conclusions and the conclusions that I give to others. These things make me confused, what actually happened to me? What psychological disorders do I have?

A: I can’t, of course, make a diagnosis on the basis of only a short letter. I can only offer some things for you to think about.

It may be that you don’t like to be around people because you don’t know how to be comfortable in social situations. Apparently, you are skilled enough to make the initial connection. You do have some friends. But then you get afraid to go to the next level. You may be justifying your fear by trying to convince yourself that people are only tools. But that’s a rationalization. I think you are lonely but don’t want to admit it.

I suggest you face your fears and get some training and support for developing social skills. Group therapy is often helpful. Group therapy provides a safe place for people to get feedback about how they are interacting with the other members of the group and to practice new ways to be with other people. Some individual therapy as well will help you conquer your feelings of inferiority.

I wish you well.
Dr. Marie



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NPR News: Rep. Andy Harris On Upcoming Health Care Bill Vote

Rep. Andy Harris On Upcoming Health Care Bill Vote
Steve Inskeep talks with Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland, a Republican and member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus. He's been reluctant to support the Republican health care bill.

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Exercise Can Slow Progression of Parkinson’s

Exercise Can Slow Progression of Parkinson’s

New research finds that exercise can delay declines in mobility and help to maintain quality of life for individuals with Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive condition that often results in mobility impairments and can lead to decreased health-related quality of life (HRQL) and death.

In the new study, researchers determined that people who exercised regularly had significantly slower declines in HRQL and mobility over a two-year period. Importantly, investigators determined that exercise can provide a significant benefit to those with advanced PD.

The research appears in the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease.

Lead investigator Miriam R. Rafferty, PhD, of Northwestern University and Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, describes the main findings of the study.

“We found that people with Parkinson’s disease who maintained exercise 150 minutes per week had a smaller decline in quality of life and mobility over two years compared to people who did not exercise or exercised less.

The smaller decline was significant for people who started the study as regular exercisers, as well as for people who started to exercise 150 minutes per week after their first study-related visit.”

The data came from the National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement Initiative (NPF-QII), an international, multicenter, prospective clinical study of care and outcomes. Over 3400 participants provided data over two years, with information collected during at least three clinic visits.

The NPF-QII study collects a variety of data on pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management of PD symptoms. These observational study visits are scheduled on a yearly basis. At each visit, exercise is measured by the self-reported number of hours per week of exercise.

Although this study did not determine which type of exercise is best, it suggests that any type of exercise done with a “dose” of at least 150 minutes per week is better than not exercising.

“People with PD should feel empowered to find the type of exercise they enjoy, even those with more advanced symptoms,” remarked Dr. Rafferty.

An unanticipated finding from the study was that the HRQL benefit associated with 30-minute increases in exercise per week was greatest in people with advanced PD.

This finding suggests the value of making exercise and physical activity more accessible to people with more severe disability.

The distinction is important as people with more advanced PD may have poor access to regular exercise, as their mobility impairments would limit their independent participation in existing community and group exercise programs.

“The most important part of the study,” according to Dr. Rafferty, “is that it suggests that people who are not currently achieving recommended levels of exercise could start to exercise today to lessen the declines in quality of life and mobility that can occur with this progressive disease.”

Source: IOS Press/EurekAlert



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Movement disorders: Comparison of cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease and essential tremor



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Sleep Deprivation Lessens Ability to Detect Some Emotions

Sleep Deprivation Lessens Ability to Detect Some Emotions

New research finds that when you are tired it is more difficult to detect whether people around you are happy or sad. Saliently, this subtle disadvantage may influence interpersonal relationships, work productivity and life satisfaction.

Specifically, University of Arizona researchers found that study participants had a harder time identifying facial expressions of happiness or sadness when they were sleep deprived versus well-rested.

The sleepy participants’ ability to interpret facial expressions of other emotions — anger, fear, surprise and disgust — was not impaired, however.

That’s likely because we’re wired to recognize those more primitive emotions in order to survive acute dangers, said lead researcher William D.S. Killgore, a UA professor of psychiatry, psychology and medical imaging.

Study findings appear in the journal Neurobiology of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms.

While emotions such as fear and anger could indicate a threat, social emotions such as happiness and sadness are less necessary for us to recognize for immediate survival.

When we’re tired, it seems we’re more likely to dedicate our resources to recognizing those emotions that could impact our short-term safety and well-being, Killgore said.

“If someone is going to hurt you, even when you’re sleep deprived you should still be able to pick up on that,” Killgore said.

“Reading whether somebody is sad or not is really not that important in that acute danger situation, so if anything is going to start to degrade with lack of sleep it might be the ability to recognize those social emotions.”

The data used in the study was part of a larger research effort on sleep deprivation’s effects on social, emotional and moral judgment.

The current study is based on data from 54 participants, who were shown photographs of the same male face expressing varying degrees of fear, happiness, sadness, anger, surprise and disgust.

Participants were asked to indicate which of those six emotions they thought was being expressed the most by each face.

Researchers used an innovative technique to assess participants’ ability to interpret subtler emotional expressions. The methodology included presenting images that were composite photos of commonly confused facial expressions morphed together by a computer program.

For example, a face might show 70 percent sadness and 30 percent disgust or vice versa. Participants saw a total of 180 blended facial expressions at each testing session.

Participants’ baseline responses to the images were compared to their responses after they were deprived of sleep for one night.

Researchers found that blatant facial expressions — such as an obvious grin or frown (90 percent happy or 90 percent sad) — were easily identifiable regardless of how much sleep a participant got.

Sleep deprived participants had a harder time, however, correctly identifying more subtle expressions of happiness and sadness, although their performance on the other emotions was unchanged.

When participants were tested again after one night of recovery sleep, their performance on happiness and sadness improved, returning to its baseline level.

While the difference in performance was not overwhelming, it’s enough that it could have a significant impact in critical social interactions, Killgore said.

“As a society, we don’t get the full seven to eight hours of sleep that people probably need to be getting. The average American is getting a little less than six hours of sleep on average, and it could affect how you’re reading people in everyday interactions,” Killgore said.

“You may be responding inappropriately to somebody that you just don’t read correctly, especially those social emotions that make us human. Or you may not be as empathic. Your spouse or significant other may need something from you and you are less able to read that.

It’s possible that this could lead to problems in your relationships or problems at work. To me, that is one of the biggest problems — how this affects our relationships.”

Killgore’s research builds on existing work on the effects of sleep deprivation on the brain’s ventromedial prefrontal cortex — an area that helps people make judgments and decisions using their emotions.

A prior study, showed that when people are sleep deprived, a disconnect occurs between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala — one of the key emotionally responsive areas of the brain.

“So, in simplistic terms, the part of the brain that controls your emotions and the part that sees faces and responds to the emotional content basically start to lose their ability to communicate,” Killgore said.

“We wanted to test that out and see if it plays out in terms of how people read facial expressions — and, in fact, it looks like it does.”

Source: University of Arizona



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